How Desperate are You? Matthew 15:21-28 Leaving that place, Jesus withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon. 22A Canaanite woman from that vicinity came to him, crying out, “Lord, Son of David, have mercy on me! My daughter is suffering terribly from demon-possession.” 23Jesus did not answer a word. So his disciples came to him and urged him, “Send her away, for she keeps crying out after us.” 24He answered, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of Israel.” 25The woman came and knelt before him. “Lord, help me!” she said. 26He replied, “It is not right to take the children’s bread and toss it to their dogs.” 27″Yes, Lord,” she said, “but even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table.” 28Then Jesus answered, “Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted.” And her daughter was healed from that very hour. How Desperate are You? If the testing of our faith is much more precious than gold, then should we be discouraged when it seems the Lord is ignoring us and refuses to hear us. This story of the Cannanite woman teaches us a valuable lesson about “great faith”. All of us move in a measure of faith, but it is interesting that in the New Testament Jesus saw great faith coming not from the Jews, but from the gentiles. Those that grasped who He was had an unshakable faith in what He could do. In Matthew 8:8-13 Jesus speaks again of great faith concerning the Roman centurion. “The centurion replied, “Lord, I do not deserve to have you come under my roof. But just say the word, and my servant will be healed. 9For I myself am a man under authority, with soldiers under me. I tell this one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and that one, ‘Come,’ and he comes. I say to my servant, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” 10When Jesus heard this, he was astonished and said to those following him, “I tell you the truth, I have not found anyone in Israel with such great faith. 11I say to you that many will come from the east and the west, and will take their places at the feast with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven. 12But the subjects of the kingdom will be thrown outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” 13Then Jesus said to the centurion, “Go! It will be done just as you believed it would.” And his servant was healed at that very hour.” One of the things that we observe here in both the woman and the centurion is that they are not looking for proof of who Jesus is or if He can perform a miracle of even that He be physically present to perform a miracle. All they need is a word. If Jesus will speak the word then they know they have that which they have petitioned Him for. These stories should be somewhat sobering to us as Christians, because I think we now are where the Jews were then. We are God’s chosen and the blessings and promises are first to us, but we, like the Israelites then often fail to have a great faith to lay hold of and sieze what the Lord has already provided for us. These gentiles, even though they knew that promises were not directly or first to them, didn’t allow that to dissuade them in their quest for Jesus to meet their need. What is even more unusual is that neither one of these gentiles were seeking a miracle for themselves, but for someone else. Their faith was standing in the place of that other person who was too sick to stand for himself or herself. There are those that are outside of Christ today that may be actually exercising and demonstrating a greater faith than we who have trusted in Christ, but we have become lax concerning our faith. Jesus honored these gentiles’ faith because they seized the kingdom of heaven by force. They refused to be denied and they pressed in until the Lord acknowledged their plea. They don’t presume to be anything or deserve anything, but they obviously had a revelation of the nature of God in Christ. They knew first that He was able and they knew that He went about doing good. They prevailed upon His goodness. They knew that even the leftovers of God’s goodness and grace were sufficient to meet their needs. If the Lord is willing to do this for the gentiles what is He willing to do for us if we will exercise this great faith? If we are so desperate for God that we refuse to be denied, will He do any less for us? We have the wealth and the riches of the kingdom at our fingertips. Philippians 4:19 says, “But my God shall supply all your need according to His riches in glory.” The promise is there, but what is our motive? Is our motive to make ourselves rich or to be the instrument to bring the riches of Christ’s love and promises to others? Great faith was seen in Abraham when he was willing to offer Isaac in obedience to God and He knew God would supply and make a way. Great faith was seen in Moses when he stood as an intercessor for the Israelites. Great faith was seen in Christ when He offered Himself up for the sins of the whole world. How will we operate in great faith? What are we willing to believe God for and act upon in behalf of others? Often our personal needs are met when we see past them and put others first. Be desperate for God. Seize the kingdom with violence and with the determination of Jacob when he wrestled with the angel. Don’t give up, PREVAIL! Blessings, #kent Matthew 15:21-28 Leaving that place, Jesus withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon. 22A Canaanite woman from that vicinity came to him, crying out, “Lord, Son of David, have mercy on me! My daughter is suffering terribly from demon-possession.” 23Jesus did not answer a word. So his disciples came to him and urged him, “Send her away, for she keeps crying out after us.” 24He answered, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of Israel.” 25The woman came and knelt before him. “Lord, help me!” she said. 26He replied, “It is not right to take the children’s bread and toss it to their dogs.” 27″Yes, Lord,” she said, “but even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table.” 28Then Jesus answered, “Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted.” And her daughter was healed from that very hour. How Desperate are You? If the testing of our faith is much more precious than gold, then should we be discouraged when it seems the Lord is ignoring us and refuses to hear us. This story of the Cannanite woman teaches us a valuable lesson about “great faith”. All of us move in a measure of faith, but it is interesting that in the New Testament Jesus saw great faith coming not from the Jews, but from the gentiles. Those that grasped who He was had an unshakable faith in what He could do. In Matthew 8:8-13 Jesus speaks again of great faith concerning the Roman centurion. “The centurion replied, “Lord, I do not deserve to have you come under my roof. But just say the word, and my servant will be healed. 9For I myself am a man under authority, with soldiers under me. I tell this one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and that one, ‘Come,’ and he comes. I say to my servant, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” 10When Jesus heard this, he was astonished and said to those following him, “I tell you the truth, I have not found anyone in Israel with such great faith. 11I say to you that many will come from the east and the west, and will take their places at the feast with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven. 12But the subjects of the kingdom will be thrown outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” 13Then Jesus said to the centurion, “Go! It will be done just as you believed it would.” And his servant was healed at that very hour.” One of the things that we observe here in both the woman and the centurion is that they are not looking for proof of who Jesus is or if He can perform a miracle of even that He be physically present to perform a miracle. All they need is a word. If Jesus will speak the word then they know they have that which they have petitioned Him for. These stories should be somewhat sobering to us as Christians, because I think we now are where the Jews were then. We are God’s chosen and the blessings and promises are first to us, but we, like the Israelites then often fail to have a great faith to lay hold of and sieze what the Lord has already provided for us. These gentiles, even though they knew that promises were not directly or first to them, didn’t allow that to dissuade them in their quest for Jesus to meet their need. What is even more unusual is that neither one of these gentiles were seeking a miracle for themselves, but for someone else. Their faith was standing in the place of that other person who was too sick to stand for himself or herself. There are those that are outside of Christ today that may be actually exercising and demonstrating a greater faith than we who have trusted in Christ, but we have become lax concerning our faith. Jesus honored these gentiles’ faith because they seized the kingdom of heaven by force. They refused to be denied and they pressed in until the Lord acknowledged their plea. They don’t presume to be anything or deserve anything, but they obviously had a revelation of the nature of God in Christ. They knew first that He was able and they knew that He went about doing good. They prevailed upon His goodness. They knew that even the leftovers of God’s goodness and grace were sufficient to meet their needs. If the Lord is willing to do this for the gentiles what is He willing to do for us if we will exercise this great faith? If we are so desperate for God that we refuse to be denied, will He do any less for us? We have the wealth and the riches of the kingdom at our fingertips. Philippians 4:19 says, “But my God shall supply all your need according to His riches in glory.” The promise is there, but what is our motive? Is our motive to make ourselves rich or to be the instrument to bring the riches of Christ’s love and promises to others? Great faith was seen in Abraham when he was willing to offer Isaac in obedience to God and He knew God would supply and make a way. Great faith was seen in Moses when he stood as an intercessor for the Israelites. Great faith was seen in Christ when He offered Himself up for the sins of the whole world. How will we operate in great faith? What are we willing to believe God for and act upon in behalf of others? Often our personal needs are met when we see past them and put others first. Be desperate for God. Seize the kingdom with violence and with the determination of Jacob when he wrestled with the angel. Don’t give up, PREVAIL! Blessings, #kent

April 13, 2016

 

Matthew 15:21-28

Leaving that place, Jesus withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon. 22A Canaanite woman from that vicinity came to him, crying out, “Lord, Son of David, have mercy on me! My daughter is suffering terribly from demon-possession.” 23Jesus did not answer a word. So his disciples came to him and urged him, “Send her away, for she keeps crying out after us.” 24He answered, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of Israel.” 25The woman came and knelt before him. “Lord, help me!” she said. 26He replied, “It is not right to take the children’s bread and toss it to their dogs.” 27″Yes, Lord,” she said, “but even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table.” 28Then Jesus answered, “Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted.” And her daughter was healed from that very hour.

How Desperate are You?

If the testing of our faith is much more precious than gold, then should we be discouraged when it seems the Lord is ignoring us and refuses to hear us.  This story of the Cannanite woman teaches us a valuable lesson about “great faith”.  All of us move in a measure of faith, but it is interesting that in the New Testament Jesus saw great faith coming not from the Jews, but from the gentiles.  Those that grasped who He was had an unshakable faith in what He could do. 

In Matthew 8:8-13 Jesus speaks again of great faith concerning the Roman centurion.  “The centurion replied, “Lord, I do not deserve to have you come under my roof. But just say the word, and my servant will be healed. 9For I myself am a man under authority, with soldiers under me. I tell this one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and that one, ‘Come,’ and he comes. I say to my servant, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” 

10When Jesus heard this, he was astonished and said to those following him, “I tell you the truth, I have not found anyone in Israel with such great faith. 11I say to you that many will come from the east and the west, and will take their places at the feast with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven. 12But the subjects of the kingdom will be thrown outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” 13Then Jesus said to the centurion, “Go! It will be done just as you believed it would.” And his servant was healed at that very hour.”  One of the things that we observe here in both the woman and the centurion is that they are not looking for proof of who Jesus is or if He can perform a miracle of even that He be physically present to perform a miracle.  All they need is a word.  If Jesus will speak the word then they know they have that which they have petitioned Him for.  

These stories should be somewhat sobering to us as Christians, because I think we now are where the Jews were then.  We are God’s chosen and the blessings and promises are first to us, but we, like the Israelites then often fail to have a great faith to lay hold of and sieze what the Lord has already provided for us.  These gentiles, even though they knew that promises were not directly or first to them, didn’t allow that to dissuade them in their quest for Jesus to meet their need.  What is even more unusual is that neither one of these gentiles were seeking a miracle for themselves, but for someone else.  Their faith was standing in the place of that other person who was too sick to stand for himself or herself.  There are those that are outside of Christ today that may be actually exercising and demonstrating a greater faith than we who have trusted in Christ, but we have become lax concerning our faith.  Jesus honored these gentiles’ faith because they seized the kingdom of heaven by force.  They refused to be denied and they pressed in until the Lord acknowledged their plea.  They don’t presume to be anything or deserve anything, but they obviously had a revelation of the nature of God in Christ.  They knew first that He was able and they knew that He went about doing good.  They prevailed upon His goodness.  They knew that even the leftovers of God’s goodness and grace were sufficient to meet their needs.  

If the Lord is willing to do this for the gentiles what is He willing to do for us if we will exercise this great faith?  If we are so desperate for God that we refuse to be denied, will He do any less for us?  We have the wealth and the riches of the kingdom at our fingertips.  Philippians 4:19 says, “But my God shall supply all your need according to His riches in glory.”  The promise is there, but what is our motive?  Is our motive to make ourselves rich or to be the instrument to bring the riches of Christ’s love and promises to others?  Great faith was seen in Abraham when he was willing to offer Isaac in obedience to God and He knew God would supply and make a way.  Great faith was seen in Moses when he stood as an intercessor for the Israelites.  Great faith was seen in Christ when He offered Himself up for the sins of the whole world.  How will we operate in great faith?  What are we willing to believe God for and act upon in behalf of others?  Often our personal needs are met when we see past them and put others first.  Be desperate for God.  Seize the kingdom with violence and with the determination of Jacob when he wrestled with the angel.  Don’t give up, PREVAIL!

Blessings,

#kent

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